Website Layout Change

Hi everyone,

I’m sorry to have to change the layout of the website, but I just spent about an hour and a half deleting over 4,000 spam comments on the website. None of these were ever viewable, but instead held for moderation. I’ve installed a plug in that will require a CAPTCHA (“type the letters you see into this box”) before a comment can be submitted. This will still allow humans to post to the site, but not robots trying to sell us various medicines. That’s what most the spam actually was.

Unfortunately, there was some type of issue in the old theme/layout that didn’t support the CAPTCHA script, which is why I’ve had to change it.

Please let me know your opinion of this layout (good OR bad) and I’ll do my best to make the site as accessible as possible!

73,

Cody KI4FUV

The “Wilderness Protocol”

As some of you may know, I’ve been working on an up to date and accurate listing of repeaters in the East Tennessee area. That project is still in the works and getting closer to being complete. While gathering data for my list, I’ve done numerous searches online and have been on countless websites.

One of the things that I’ve ran across several times now is the “Wilderness Protocol.” As I’m sitting here tonight looking through an ARRL Repeater Directory, I see something about it again, and that’s the inspiration to write this post.

Here is what the Repeater Directory has to say…

“The Wilderness Protocol is a suggestion that those outside of repeater range should monitor standard simplex channels at specific times in case others have priority calls. The primary frequency is 146.52 MHz, with 52.525, 223.5, 446.0 and 1294.5 MHz serving as secondary frequencies. This system was conceived to facilitate communications between hams that were hiking or backpacking in uninhabited areas, outside repeater range. However, the Wilderness Protocol should not be viewed as something just for hikers. It can (and should) be used by everyone anywhere repeater coverage is unavailable. The protocol only becomes effective when many people use it.”
 
“The Wilderness Protocol recommends that those stations able to do so should monitor the primary (and secondary if possible) frequency every three hours starting at 7 am, local time for 5 minutes (7:00-7:05 am, 10:00-10:05 am, ….). Additionally, those stations that have sufficient power resources should monitor for 5 minutes at the top of every hour, or even continuously.”

What this all boils down to, is that it’s a recommendation that we all monitor the designated calling frequencies. Last summer while on my cross country road trip (over 4,400 miles), I had my Yaesu 857 in the car with me. For the vast majority of the trip it stayed on 146.520 MHz. Sure, I wasn’t hiking that distance, but as the Repeater Directory says, this isn’t just about hiking.

The calling channels are there for just as their name says, to place calls to other amateurs. We may be in an unfamiliar area and not know the frequencies or the required tones to access local repeaters if we need directions or have some type of emergency. If more hams simply monitored the calling channel(s), amateur radio could be MUCH more useful when it’s needed.

Back to my road trip… Because of prior planning and knowing that I’d be without cell phone coverage for much of the time I was travelling across Wyoming, I did some research weeks before the trip about what repeaters were out there. I had a list of the frequencies, tones and the mile markers where they have coverage. However, there were still gaps in coverage where I relied on 146.520 simplex and the hope that if we needed anything, someone somewhere would be monitoring.

Out of 79 hours in the vehicle driving with probably 65 of those hours monitoring 146.520, I heard one conversation on it between two hams in Wyoming who were so close, they preferred not to tie up a repeater. While inside Yellowstone, I saw several amateur radio license plates and almost every one of these vehicles had at least one antenna, but every CQ I put out on 146.520 was met with dead silence.

Back home to East Tennessee, I keep 146.520, 446.000 and several of the common simplex frequencies from each band in my radios scan list. Unless I’m talking to someone, my radio is in scan and monitoring those frequencies. Same for my truck’s radio. I have heard stations traveling on I-40 calling on simplex and answered them. Thankfully none of the calls were for emergencies, but I know I enjoy when someone answers my call. I’m sure those hams were grateful also.

I know there are a few hams that like to carry on conversations on 146.520, making it undesirable to listen to. Those still seem to be few and far between.

All of that was just to make a suggestion… Whatever radios you may have, check to make sure you have these frequencies programmed in and keep an ear on them when you can. You never know when someone may be passing through and just looking for someone to talk to, or when someone may be in need of some type of assistance and the calling channels are the only frequency they know because they’re not from the area.

It’s a simple act that may make a big difference someday.

RCARC February Meeting and Newsletter!

Click Here to Read The February 2015 RCARC Beacon Newsletter!!

Hello Everyone!

Don’t forget that RCARC will hold our monthly meeting on Thursday February 12th @ 7:00 PM in the Roane County Rescue Squad building at 2735 Roane State Highway, Harriman TN. in Midtown just across the road from the old drive in theater. I hope to see everyone there. Last Months meeting was cancelled abruptly due to the loss of our meeting site that night due to remodeling work and a big fire in Midtown that caused the Rescue Squad to be activated and we couldnt’ get in.

So come on down! It should be warm inside and we look forward to seeing you!!

Also, don’t forget that dues are up for renewal for 2015. The application is in the “About Us” tab at the right column.

C-ya
Jim
K4APY

2015 Officers & Christmas Dinner Recap

I thought we had a very good meeting and Christmas Dinner tonight at RCARC!! Lots of good food and drink and fellowship! Met a couple new folks and had a few former members come. Cliff gave a very good presentation on the DSTAR repeater going up at Roosevelt. I think it motivated some folks to go out and buy one.

Officers for 2015 are:

Cliff Segar KD4GT – President
Harry Tirrell KB4AA – Vice President
Ed Smith K5QPO – Secretary
Jim White K4APY – Treasurer.

There was no opponent in the race so the election was by acclamation.

Sterling Edmonds N4VAV got a certificate of appreciation for his efforts helping with the annual Field Day event and securing a sizeable donation that financially benefitted the club this year.

Norm Burns KK4YEU was not present but was to be presented a certificate of appreciation for his lions share of sales of the RCARC Almanac Ads. Lee Grace offered to take Norms certificate to him.

Phil Newman KE4LSH and Anna Hayes KE4VJM both received certificates of appreciation for their excellent job with RCARC Fundraising projects.

Greg Wallace brought his “go box” and I must say the box he used was very nice. He said he bought it at LUV’s Truck Stop and I was impressed by the size and what could be fit inside. Good Job Greg!!

We still have a few folks needing to pickup and pay for their Ham Tag and RCARC Memberships renewals are being accepted now for 2015.

Website Maintenance

If you’re seeing this message then you’re loading our website from our new web server! There are a few small things I’m working on but everything should be working. We use WordPress software to maintain the website and our old server limited us to an older version (somewhere around version 2.1). I found it would be easier to do a clean install of the current version (4.x) and import our data.

Because of that, there is a little work to do to get everything just like it was in the past.

If you have any problems, please email me.

Cody, KI4FUV

September 2014 RCARC Newsletter

Click here to read the September 2014 RCARC Newsletter

The Roane County Amateur Radio Club will hold it’s September 2014
meeting on Thursday September 11th at 7:00 pm in the Roane
County Rescue Squad building 2735 Roane State Highway, Harriman, TN.
Enter from the rear of the building off Old Hwy 70 behind the United Way office.
Try to make it to the meeting if you can. We have had several new members and
visitors lately which is good. Bring a friend!! Everyone is welcome!
Talk In will be on the 147.015 repeater. I hope to see you all
there!!
73, Jim White K4APY
Www.ke4rx.org
On Facebook: The Roane County Amateur Radio Club

RCARC May Meeting and Newsletter

Click Here to Read the RCARC Beacon Newsletter for May 2014

Today at 2:11 PM

The Roane County Amateur Radio Club will hold it’s May
meeting on Thursday May 8th at 7:00 pm in the Roane
County Rescue Squad building. Enter from the rear of the
building off Old Hwy 70 behind the United Way office. Camp
Buck Toms will be on the agenda and Field Day Planning will
begin I am sure. Try to make it to the meeting if you can.
Talk In will be on the 147.015 repeater. I hope to see you all
there!!
73, Jim White K4APY
Www.ke4rx.org
On Facebook: The Roane County Amateur Radio Club

RCARC March Meeting and Newsletter

Click Here to read the March 2014 RCARC Beacon Newsletter Online!

Don’t Forget!!
The next meeting of The Roane County Amateur Radio Club is on Thursday March 13, 2014 at 7:00 pm in the Roane County Rescue Squad building 2735 Roane State Highway , Harriman, TN. in Midtown. Be there if you can and bring a friend!! Talk In on 147.015+ (pl 110.9)

Also at our April Meeting RCARC will sponsor The National Weather Service of Morristown TN.for SKYWARN Storm Spotter Training. The entire evening will be devoted to SKYWARN so plan to stay until about 9:30 to complete the training.

Finally RCARC now has a Facebook Group. Login to facebook to check out and join our group.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/561189603975774/